Tuesday, May 24, 2016

PHOTOGRAPHY F/2.0 | Let's practice in Aperture Priority Mode!

--> Hello!  It's Farrah again with more photography talk.  We learned about the exposure triangle in the last postSo, let's put what we've learned into a practical setting.


Reminder:

Aperture
The aperture controls the amount of light that passes through the camera lens. When you press the shutter button on your camera, you are opening the shutter to allow light to pass through the lens and create an image of what the lens sees. It’s just like how your eyes work to create pictures in your brain of what you are looking at.  If you shoot with the aperture adjusted to the smallest opening, the smallest amount of light is allowed to enter. For example, if you are taking a photo in an environment that’s too bright — how should you adjust your aperture? Simple — adjust to smaller aperture to let in less light. The aperture’s sizes are measured by f-stops. A higher f-stop means a smaller aperture hole while a lower f-stop means a bigger aperture opening.  Aperture refers to how wide or narrow the lens opens.  Lenses these days open in a rounded motion, so your aperture is a circle (or a polygon, like an octagon, that is close to a circular shape).  How wide or narrow it opens determines how much light can get through the lens at one time.  Then your shutter speed determines how long the shutter stays open.  Again, think about your eyes.  Your pupil works like the aperture of your camera.  When lighting is dim, you iris (colored part of your eye) will dilate your pupil (the black part) to a large aperture to allow more light to the lens of your eye.  When you are in bright light, your pupils get really small, like a narrow aperture, to allow in less light.
Note:  Remember that larger apertures are the smaller numbers on the camera settings, like f/1.2.  Smaller apertures are the larger numbers, like f/22.  This is important understand when you are setting your aperture.

Depth of Field (DOF)
The aperture also controls the depth of field, a larger opening will give you a narrow plane of focus.
Consider the “field” to be your scene, whether it is an actual field or something as small as your tabletop.  Depth of Field refers to the distance within that scene you can see in focus.  A shallow or narrow depth of field will focus on some plane within the full depth of the scene, and the rest of the scene will be out of focus or blurry.   A deep or long depth of field will show all or most of the scene in focus, including the foreground and background.  This is important for choosing an aperture value.
Shooting in Aperture Priority mode means that you choose your aperture, and then the camera will use its built in light meter to adjust the shutter speed accordingly. The larger apertures (smaller numbers) will deliver a shallow depth of field.  This means that part of your image will be in focus, and other parts will be blurry.  This is nice for portraits or flowers, or any subject that you want to stand out from the background.  You may also want to stick to the larger apertures if you are shooting in low light.
How low/large you can go depends on your lens.  Higher end lenses will have larger aperture options.  Look at your lens.  You might know that it’s, say, a 28-70 zoom lens, but do you see that other number next to your zoom range?   That’s your largest/widest (lowest number) aperture possible with that lens at its shortest zoom setting.  On some zoom lenses, the widest aperture possible will decrease as you zoom in on your subject. 

Sunday, May 8, 2016

Enfold | Collection

We are so excited to show our new collection called ''Enfold'' wich is exclusively available at The digital press.
http://shop.thedigitalpress.co/Project-Grateful-Enfold.html


Happy NSD !



Happy NSD everyone,
I hope you all are having a wonderful time! This week my blogpost will be a little bit longer than usual, but we can blame that on the awesome NSD deals and fun challenges for this weekend.

My first NSD deal is a HUGE grab bag. My sweet friend KimB designs and I teamed up and created this awesome summer vacation beach themed collection, it contains a full kit, a complete template album, alpha pack, wordart/stickers/wordbits, masks, pocketcards, and some vellum and embossed papers. This whole collection-Grabbag is available during NSD for only $8 and exclusively available at TDP.
DESTINATION ESCAPE

Thursday, April 14, 2016

PHOTOGRAPHY F/2.0 | EXPOSURE TRIANGLE

--> Want to improve your photography skills? Photography is really all about the light.  How much light gets into your camera to make the image.  You’ll hear a lot about the “big three” or the “exposure triangle” when learning to shoot in manual mode.  These refer to ISO, aperture, and shutter speed.  

I shoot in manual mode exclusively and when I go to set my settings, I always set my ISO first, so we’ll start there.  ISO is all about the sensitivity level of your camera to available light.  A lower number represents lower sensitivity to light while higher numbers mean heightened sensitivity. The drawback in using increased sensitivity is that it produces noisier images. Simply put, you end up with grainy pictures if you use high ISO. One advantage of DSLRs is that you can increase the ISO and they handle better in lower light situations. Of course, we’d all love to have the highest quality images, but the disadvantage of shooting with higher ISOs and having an increase in noise/grain can be a small price to pay when capturing memories at night or at a ballet recital.  


Friday, April 1, 2016

INDEXED | COLLECTION

We are so excited to show our new collection called ''Indexed'' wich is exclusively available at The digital press.

Hello April | Special edition

Goodbye March.... Hello April,

A new beginning of a new month, and not only that it's April fool's day. Did you prank someone? At every beginning of a new month designers at The digital Press release a new special edition, wich is 50% althrough the weekend.

Monday, March 28, 2016

PHOTOGRAPHY f/2.0 | DSLR vs. P&S cameras

I know that not all scrapbookers are photographers, so I thought we should start out simply with a discussion about cameras. I’ll preface this with the fact that currently, I do not have a point and shoot camera.  I use my cell phone for random snapshots and I’ll focus on the cell phone camera another day.  I totally rock the cell phone and you will to! ;)  I have been thinking about one of those polaroid type instant cameras for fun with the kiddies, but have no actual experience with them…yet.

P&S vs DSLR – What is the difference and what are the pros and cons for each?

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